5 Stories I’d Love to See in Star Wars

I know, I know. Every single Star Wars fan on the planet has, at one time or another, said, “I wish they’d make a story about….” and put in their two cents worth on future Star Wars projects. I’m no exception. And while of course the good people at Lucasfilm/Disney can’t satisfy every fan’s wishlist, we all do have our opinions; I simply see it as proof of the richness of Star Wars and its storytelling potential.

So in an ideal world, what stories would I love to see? Well, here are my top five ideas (and this includes movies, books, comics, TV shows, or whatever medium may tell the story best):

  • Okay, so I know LF/Disney are done with the Skywalker saga, at least in film, but I’m hoping that books aren’t off the table in continuing Rey’s story. I would love to see what she does next, if she trains more Jedi, what the galaxy is like after the Emperor is gone. Is there another central government, or do all the worlds and systems simply rule themselves now? What about Finn’s Force sensitivity? Does he become a Jedi? What role would the Jedi play in this new world? What kind of adventures can Rey, Finn and Poe go on? And what is the legacy of Ben Solo, pertaining to Rey in particular? Is he with her in some form? Force ghost? Voice? I want to know!
Ochi of Bestoon was responsible for the death of Rey's parents, but he was involved with the dark side of the Force way back during the Clone Wars.
  • I’d love to know Rey’s parents story. Palpatine’s clone cast-off–what was his life like? How did he meet Rey’s mother? Who was she? What were their names, for goodness sake! What was their life like on the run from Papa Palpie, and how did they survive? Tell me this wouldn’t be a good story.
Satine Kryze and Obi Wan Kenobi star wars poster prints
  • I would love a book telling the story of how Obi-Wan met the Duchess Satine Kryze when they were young during the Mandalorian Civil War. Qui Gon and Obi-Wan’s mission to protect her, what they did and where they went, the budding relationship between the two young people. And where does Bo-Katan fit into the story? Who are Satine’s parents and what happened to them? What are the particular politics involved? There may be some answers to these questions somewhere, but I want a book, darnit!
  • Shmi Skywalker‘s story. Where is she from, who are her parents, how did she become a slave? I suppose we could go back and back into the history and genealogy of the Skywalkers, but I’d love to know at least Shmi’s story. What were the circumstances of her discovering her pregnancy? I’ve heard a reference about Thrawn and the Chiss’ knowledge of “Sky Walkers,” though I haven’t read any of the books about Thrawn yet to quite know what they are. Coincidence? I think not.
  • This one is kind of obvious, and may be answered in some form someday, but the mystery of where Thrawn and Ezra disappeared to has to be addressed. Some people think perhaps The Mandalorian may shed some light on it, but who knows? Where do they end up, in what circumstances, do they become allies against a common enemy, or do they remain antagonists? And what about Sabine and Ahsoka’s journey to find them? Aarg, so many questions!

There’s literally a zillion spin-off stories that could be told in Star Wars, but these are at the top of my mind. They’re mostly character-oriented, personal stories, the kind that I particularly enjoy. And if none of these stories get told, that’s okay. That’s what imagination is for. Or fan fiction, if that’s your thing!

What stories would you love to see in Star Wars? Comment below and we’ll talk about it!

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Like to read Star Wars? Check out my sister blog The Star Wars Reader. I regularly review Star Wars books, both Legends and Canon.

5 Favorite Star Wars Links and Channels (Right Now)

Since my obsession with Star Wars was reignited in the past year or so, I’ve been busy trying to catch up with everything that’s been going on in the universe in the past twenty years while I’d been doing other things. That means many hours watching Youtube videos and scrolling through a ton of other social media, and more importantly, separating the wheat from the chaff, so to speak. I’ve found some great channels and sites that I love, and others that, well, aren’t so great. I like to focus on the positive, so here are my top five Star Wars-related social media channels and sites:

  • Wookiepedia. This is a vast, extremely comprehensive archive of everything Star Wars, including characters, the movies and shows, vessels, books, video games, you name it. I use it a lot when I’m looking for a bit more information on something I’m blogging about, or if I don’t know a thing about a character or planet, etc. I haven’t really begun to plumb its depths, but it’s a great resource when you want information about something specific.
  • At-At Chat. I discovered this Youtube channel early on, and I’m so glad I did. I’ve noticed that there are a lot of Star Wars Youtubers who are fond of using clickbait, outrageous headlines and rumors, hateful and/or just plain dumb stuff to get people to their channel and to make money off of it. It’s really annoying. AT-AT Chat is NOT one of those channels. He presents his opinions and ideas on the Star Wars universe in an engaging, yet intelligent and rational manner. No hype, just fun stuff that is remarkably well-thought out and thought-provoking. I especially love his lightsaber-duel analyses and his takes on Kylo Ren/Ben Solo.
  • Star Wars Reading Club. This Youtube channel discusses many intriguing or burning questions about Star Wars in the context of what happened in books and comics, both Legends and Canon. It’s a great resource for me, as I’m still catching up on Legends lore; I’m also not a big comic book reader (though I’m seriously thinking about becoming one) and a lot of great stuff happens in comics that I don’t know about but would love to. The only criticism I have of the channel is the narrator’s monotone style of speaking; I also twitch a bit when he says, “Obi-One.” He knows his Star Wars lore, though!
  • Youtini. I’ve talked a bit about Youtini on my other blog, The Star Wars Reader, but feel it should be mentioned here, too. I just discovered this great resource for Star Wars books and comics, both Legends and Canon. Here you can check out the latest releases, book reviews, and excerpts. There’s also a great timeline page that lists the books chronologically (a separate one for Legends, and one for Canon) based on the BBY marker (Before the Battle of Yavin). I’ve come here quite a bit to make sure my own timeline listings are correct, and to add any books I’ve missed. There’s also a cool application where you can make lists of your own Star Wars library, as well as chat boards to talk about the books. I love this webpage!
  • James Arnold Taylor. In case you don’t know, James Arnold Taylor is the voice-actor who voices Obi-Wan Kenobi on The Clone Wars. Since I’m a big Obi-Wan fan, I was curious about the man who gives him his voice in Clone Wars, and guess what? He’s a pretty awesome dude! Very down-to-earth and likable. He’s got his own Youtube channel where he talks about the voice-over profession in general, and his own projects in particular, which is all very fascinating to me; but what I’ve been especially loving is his series Clone Wars Conversations, where he interviews his fellow co-stars from the animated series. I’ve watched his two-part interview with Matt Lanter, who voices Anakin Skywalker, and it was just so wonderful to listen to them reminisce about their Clone Wars experiences (it was recorded before Season Seven was announced, however), and also surreal to hear the character’s voices coming out of these people’s mouths! He also interviews others from the show, like Sam Witwer who played Maul, Anna Graves who played the Duchess Satine Kryze, and others. If you want more Obitine, you must watch Taylor and Graves recite Romeo and Juliet in Obi-Wan’s and Satine’s voices. Be still my sentimental little heart!

These are the sources I’ve been going to and enjoying over and over lately. I’m sure as I continue to explore the galaxy far, far away I’ll discover some more great channels, and I’ll certainly share them here when I do. They’re almost as limitless as the stars themselves, and I’m so grateful for all the wonderful Star Wars content out there.

What are some of your favorite Star Wars channels and websites? Comment below and we’ll talk about it!

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Like to read Star Wars? Check out my sister blog The Star Wars Reader. I regularly review Star Wars books, both Legends and Canon.

My Five Favorite Jedi

If I haven’t said it before, I’ll say it now: I’m a big fan of the Jedi. I have no ill will towards Sith fans, or those who claim to prefer the Dark Side. I guess. I suppose I just don’t understand them–I’m light side all the way. I’ll always root for them in a fight and consider them heroes, to be admired and emulated.

Anyway, I thought I’d list my top 5 favorite Jedi. Probably no surprises here, since I’m not familiar with a lot of the Legends Jedi (which I hope to eventually remedy). I had a lot to say here, so it’s kind of long. Sorry. But here they are:

  • Obi-Wan Kenobi. Duh. I think he’s universally considered the greatest Jedi ever, with few exceptions. And he’s certainly my personal favorite. Obi-Wan’s skills, commitment and discipline, kindness and compassion, as well as his witty repartee all commend him as the best. But here’s the kicker: despite a lifetime of grief and loss, he never gives in to the Dark Side. Qui Gon Jinn, Satine Kryze, Anakin Skywalker (and Padme, to some extent); not to mention the entire Jedi Order and a way of life he’s always known: all huge personal losses, and grief and sorrow and yes, anger and hatred, flows through him. Yet, he stands firm. Anakin falls because of his mere fear of losing Padme; Obi-Wan endures unimaginable losses, and remains committed to the light. His life arc is interesting, as well: he starts out as a rather arrogant young Jedi, calling both Jar Jar and young Anakin “pathetic life forms;” he goes on to become an amazing war hero during the Clone Wars; and in his later years, he becomes the hermit in the desert who treats his fallen enemy (and the one who killed two of his loved ones) with compassion. No matter his circumstances, he trusts in the Force completely. Despite all this, he isn’t perfect: he’s a bit uptight in the emotions department (which, in the end, served him well); he follows the Jedi Code almost to a fault; and he lost his Padawan to the Dark Side. Did he fail Anakin? Yes. And also no. That’s a debate for a whole other blog post, though. Despite his flaws, Obi-Wan is a class act who sets the bar amazingly high.
Obi-Wan’s “Thing”: Form 3 (Soresu) Ready Stance
  • Luke Skywalker. Ah, Luke. The first Jedi that we really come to know in this whole Star Wars thing. When I was a kid, I thought Luke was cool and all, but Han Solo was my guy. I still love Han, of course, but I’ve really come to appreciate Luke’s character and his arc in the films. I love his innocence in A New Hope, and his growing Force powers in The Empire Strikes Back. But it’s in Return of the Jedi that Luke really shines. His rescue of Han from Jabba and his realization that Leia is his sister are both satisfying, showcasing his newfound confidence and maturity. But of course it’s his confrontation with his father, Darth Vader, that defines Luke’s character. He is tempted by the Dark Side, yes. Terribly. The Emperor’s threat against his friends, and in particular, Vader’s threat against his sister, drives him to the brink of the Dark. But he ultimately achieves what his father never could: to trust in the Force, and in himself. When he throws away his lightsaber and declares to Sidious, “Never. I’ll never join the Dark Side. You’ve failed, Your Highness. I am a Jedi, like my father before me,” Luke is willing to throw everything–the Rebellion, his friends, his very life–away to do what is right. That kind of selflessness and devotion to the Light is what defines a Jedi, and Luke passed with flying colors. He plumbed the depths of his own darkness, and rose above it. Daddy Vader was impressed; he finally realized that his son had surpassed him. Luke’s love for his father reminded him that he could be more than the ruined, hateful thing he’d become. Luke reminded him that Anakin was still in there somewhere–something that Padme had believed–and it was Anakin who threw the Emperor down the shaft, saving his son. They saved each other. The whole thing is so powerful and poetic, I just love it. And I haven’t even gotten to Sequel Trilogy Luke, but that’s going to be a whole ‘nother blog post. This one’s long enough!
The man, the myth, the legend.
  • Qui Gon Jinn. I think Qui Gon was one of the best parts of The Phantom Menace. Obi-Wan Kenobi’s Master, he’s considered a bit of a rebel within the Jedi Order. He often disagrees with the Council, which tends to irritate his more strait-laced young Padawan. But Qui Gon’s contention with the Council doesn’t originate in rebelliousness for its own sake; he simply looks at the Force and the role of the Jedi differently. He tends to put more importance on the living Force, rather than the cosmic Force. All that means is that he thinks a Jedi should focus on the present, and on the Force present in the beings around them. That’s why he takes such an interest in Jar Jar, and later Anakin; he feels they both have a part to play in what they’re trying to accomplish, while Obi-Wan would just as soon leave them both behind on their respective worlds. And of course, Anakin turns out to be the Chosen One. Qui Gon also has an interest in the Jedi Prophecies (of which the prophecy of the Chosen One is a part); not so much to be able to divine the future (which is a form of control), but of what insights they can offer. (There is much more about Qui Gon’s interest in the Jedi Prophecies, as well as his relationship with Obi-Wan, in the book Master and Apprentice, which I highly recommend). The Jedi Council at this point has lost its way, as we come to see more clearly later in the prequel trilogy; but Qui Gon is not one of them. His insight, compassion, and wisdom make him one of my favorite Jedi, and he was taken away from us too soon.
Qui-Gon Jinn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Qui Gon Jinn, the mystic. And he’s pretty good with a lightsaber, too.
  • Kanan Jarrus. I wasn’t totally sold on the idea of Rebels at first, but once I got through the first season, I was firmly on board. One of the reasons for this was Kanan Jarrus. He’s a fascinating look at what might happen to a Jedi Padawan who survives Order 66. When their entire world fell, they had to find answers to questions like: where do I go? What do I do in this new world of the Empire? How do I stay hidden? How can I answer the terrible betrayal of Order 66? And should I? At first, Kanan was content to forget his old life, to try to stay under the radar, and move on. He tried to convince himself that it didn’t matter, what’s done is done, and he couldn’t care less about what happens in the universe. He works, he drinks and carouses, he hides his Force powers. He has a rather cocky attitude. (The book A New Dawn examines Kanan’s life before he meets Hera and the Ghost crew more thoroughly). But deep inside, Caleb Dume (his given name, associated with his Jedi years) still lives. He tends to pop out in a crisis, helping others and doing the right thing. Very Jedi-like things. There’s something inside Kanan that won’t die and needs expression, try as he might to suppress it. Once he meets Hera and becomes a part of the Ghost crew, he has the chance to utilize that aspect of himself. And once he meets Ezra and begins to train him in the Jedi ways, he finally starts to remember. And not just remember the Jedi ways, but to once again embody them. He becomes more fully himself again, what he was meant to be. By teaching Ezra, he relearns what it is to be a Jedi. When he is blinded, he becomes even more attuned to the Force; he truly comes into his power. I absolutely love Kanan’s arc in the show–when he first meets Hera, it’s she that must show him how to live a meaningful life; but later it’s Kanan who asks Hera what she truly wants out of life when all the fighting is over. He reminds her not to forget about love. And when the time comes (as it inevitably does) for him to sacrifice himself for the cause and those he loves–when his “moment” comes–he faces it with a quiet, stoic bravery that left me in tears. The fact that he seems to resurface in the Lothwolf as an embodiment of the living Force is just, well, awesome. The spirit of Caleb Dume lives.
The Fallen Knight. The Force was with him, always.
The evolution of Kanan Jarrus.
  • Ahsoka Tano. I wrote quite a bit about Ahsoka Tano in one of my Women of Star Wars posts here. Some may say that Ahsoka shouldn’t be on this list, as she says herself to Vader in Rebels, “I am no Jedi.” But, I’m sorry Ahsoka, I beg to differ. You are a Jedi, whether you call yourself one or not. Ahsoka trained in the Jedi Temple from a young age and served as a Padawan to Anakin Skywalker during the Clone Wars. Even though she left the Temple, leaving behind the Jedi and her life there, one cannot simply erase all that. If we can call Luke Skywalker a Jedi, who received some quick training from Yoda as a fully grown man, or even Ezra from Kanan’s teachings, or Rey from Luke’s advice (not even training, in my book)–if they can be called Jedi, then Ahsoka is clearly one. So she makes the cut. Anyway, once Ahsoka moved beyond her snippy, new-Padawan-know-it-all phase, I liked her. She complemented Anakin like no other Padawan possibly could. And she brought out the best in Anakin. I probably loved her even more in Rebels. When she faced Darth Vader and realized he was her former master, she refused to leave him, as she did in Clone Wars, come what may. From what I understand, she’s supposed to make an appearance in The Mandalorian, and I can’t wait to see what she’s going to do. By the way, I love that Ahsoka uses two lightsabers. If I could be a Jedi, I’d be her: I like how this girl moves.
spoiler] The evolution of Ahsoka Tano : starwarsrebels
Our girl Ahsoka through the years.

Honorable Mentions:

  • Yoda. Who doesn’t love Yoda? Old and wise beyond our imagining. A master for a reason. Cute and ugly at the same time. And fun to watch with a lightsaber.
  • Rey. You may not agree with me, but I liked Rey. A lot. She’s sweet, loyal, strong, not afraid to cry, and defeats her evil grandpa. You go, girl. She’s also the subject of one of my Women of Star Wars posts, here.
  • Jedi Council Members. Plo Kloon, Kit Fisto, Ki-Adi-Mundi, Shakti, and all those other cool Jedi Masters on the Council. (Except Mace Windu. I don’t like that guy.)

You might be wondering, Where’s Anakin? Here’s the thing: Yes, he was a powerful Jedi. Probably the most powerful ever. The Chosen One. Clone Wars hero. But he fell to the Dark Side. What made the above list of Jedi great–characteristics like patience, commitment, faith, and selflessness–are traits that Anakin lacked. So I can’t include him on my list. It’s the same reason I haven’t included Quinlan Voss. In Dark Disciple, he also fell to the Dark Side. I understand the reasons they were vulnerable and fell, and they have my compassion. But I can’t admire them.

Anyway, that’s my list and my why’s. Sorry so long, but I didn’t really want to break it up into parts.

Who’s your favorite Jedi, and why? Comment below and we’ll talk about it!

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Like to read Star Wars? Check out my sister blog The Star Wars Reader. I regularly review Star Wars books, both Legends and Canon.