The Book of Boba Fett: Chapter 7 Review

In the Name of Honor

The Book Of Boba Fett Episode 7 Breakdown & Easter Eggs Explained
Double the Mando, double the damage.

The season finale of The Book of Boba Fett aired Wednesday, and I, for one, really enjoyed it. The series has been a little uneven, to put it mildly, and our expectations were constantly challenged. I don’t necessarily think that’s a bad thing. Star Wars has a certain feel, and there are certain things we expect, but I hope it never gets predictable (I imagine that’s why I loved The Last Jedi so much).

Anyway, despite how one may feel about the series as a whole, this last episode wrapped things up fairly well, with only a few little bumps. I don’t think I’ll do a full recap, because I want to comment on a few things, but basically all the players came together in Mos Espa to duke it out for Tatooine.

First, I want to mention that I love how Din isn’t abandoning his beliefs simply because he got kicked out of the Children of the Watch. Probably not surprising, but I figured maybe he’d take his helmet off more often, because that’s the reason he got kicked out in the first place. I thought maybe he’d think, you know what? The heck with it, now I can do what I want. But of course he doesn’t–he’s Mando. These are beliefs he grew up with, and though he’s bent the rules a few times–with the ultimate result of being cast out–he still believes in that “bantha poo-doo,” as Boba calls it. He promised Boba he’d help him; he’s not going to run when things start to look bad. His word is as strong as beskar; he’s willing to go down with Boba here.

The Book of Boba Fett' Episode 7 Recap: In the Name of Honor
Baby goes solo.

Secondly, I’ve heard some comments about Luke sending Grogu back to Mando by himself, with only Artoo to pilot the ship. When I saw the X-wing heading towards Tatooine, I thought, oh, okay, that was quick, Luke is bringing Grogu back already. But once he lands at Peli’s bay–no Luke. Just little Grogu peeking out, with Artoo in the back. Some people have called Luke “vindictive” for not accompanying Grogu, that he’s pissed that he chose Mando and so basically sent him off to fend for himself.

Please.

Even though we’re still trying to figure Luke out during this time period, I think we can assume Luke is above petty vindictiveness. Why would he give Grogu a choice in the first place if he’s going to judge him by his answer? If he’s going to go that far, just hide Mando’s gift, keep the kid and keep training him, if that’s what he wants. Grogu would be none the wiser. But Luke recognizes that there’s a conflict in Grogu, and that’s why he wanted to give him the choice (and there’s a big debate about this too; claims that Luke is making the same mistake as the prequel Jedi in not letting Grogu train and still have his attachments–that’s a conversation for another post, I think, lol).

But that doesn’t answer the question: why send him back alone? Well, I think the answer is that we just don’t know. We didn’t see them parting ways. Maybe something important came up and Luke couldn’t leave. Who knows? But I don’t think we should assume anything.

Episode 7 | Explore Tumblr Posts and Blogs | Tumgir
Reunited, and it feels so good.

Besides, Luke showed up in the Mandalorian S2 finale to save the day. I don’t think the writers wanted him to show up again and repeat that motif. So Grogu came alone. Maybe Luke gave him a big hug and some cookies and sent him on his way. I’m not going to worry about it.

Some feel that Grogu coming back in this series at all was a mistake, that the writers should have waited for Mando S3 to tell that story. That the whole build up of the first two seasons of The Mandalorian, of Din trying to get Grogu back to the Jedi, and their heartbreaking goodbye, was all for nothing to have him come back so soon, and not even in the right show. And maybe they’re right.

Was I disappointed to see Grogu? Nope! Not gonna lie, I loved seeing him come back to his Mando dad. I’m impatient. I didn’t want to wait until later this year to see their reunion, and I’m glad it happened now. So once Mando S3 starts, they’re back in the saddle and ready for the next adventure, whatever it may be.

Easter Eggs You May Have Missed In The Book Of Boba Fett Episode 7
Don’t piss him off.

So, what about Boba? This is his show, after all, lol. That’s a bit harder to answer. I was on board with him wanting to change, after the Sarlaac and his time with the Tuskens. He wanted a family, people he could trust, and to put his bounty-hunting days behind him. He wanted to protect the people of Mos Espa, and of Tatooine. Okay. And he did that, defeating the Pykes with the help of all his allies, after some initial problems. He killed Cad Bane (we think–red winking light? Idk), and I think it’s important that he killed him with the gaffi stick and not his blasters. The gaffi stick is a symbol of who he is now, and everything he’s learned from the Tuskens.

Bane called him a “cold-blooded killer” (as if he could talk), and then Boba proved him right by killing him. Was it out of character? I don’t think so. Boba has changed, yes, he wants to do the right thing (I guess), but he’s no Jedi. You mess with him, he’s gonna get those crazy eyes and mess you up.

But then at the end of the episode, he’s walking with Fennec and generally feeling uncomfortable with the people he saved honoring him. And he says, “I don’t think we’re cut out for this.” I’m not sure what to make of that statement. Some think it means he’s going to move on and leave it to someone else (Fennec replies to him, “If not us, who?” which leads me to another point soon).

It seems strange to me that Boba would go through all that and risk his life to drive the Pykes out and become the leader (daimyo) of Tatooine, and then immediately leave because he’s uncomfortable with it. Huh? I thought that’s what he wanted. I guess you should be careful what you wish for, lol. But maybe he’s just commenting on it, without really any intention of leaving. I really don’t know.

Book of Boba Fett: Episode 7 Post Credit Scene Explained
Vanth on the mend.

But then we get a post-credit scene of Cobb Vanth in Boba’s bacta tank. We were led to believe he was dead, shot down by Bane, but now we see he’s not quite dead yet, lol. And the Mod who saved Fennec is getting ready to “modify” him, if you know what I mean. So, I’m glad that he’s alive. But are they setting us up for Cobb Vanth to take over for Boba? It could work, I suppose. But again, I just think it’s weird that Boba would suddenly take off after gaining what he supposedly wanted.

Those are the main points I wanted to talk about. The rest of the show was entertaining. The action was great, the massive droids were cool, and of course, Boba showing up on the rancor was fabulous! It was inevitable, and it was great. And then Grogu calming the beast down afterward was priceless–size, indeed, matters not. The little guy curled up asleep next to the rancor was pretty darn cute. And the ending scene with Mando giving in to Grogu and hitting his turbo or whatever it was and streaking super-fast through space was fun, too. Grogu sitting in that little bubble in Mando’s ship was clearly meant to be, lol.

The Book of Boba Fett episode 7 recap: a fittingly muddled season finale
Monster on the loose.

So, no word on if there’s going to be a Season 2 of Boba Fett, but I’m guessing no. I think the show served its purpose–telling Boba’s story and also being a bridge to The Mandalorian S3. I think Boba and Fennec will surely show up in future shows (especially if Boba does leave Tatooine). Was it perfect? Nah. But it had some perfect moments.

What did you think of Episode 7? Let me know in the comments and we’ll talk about it!

The Book of Boba Fett Episode 6 Review

Please be warned there are major spoilers for Episode 6 below.

“From the Desert Comes a Stranger.”

#$^*(&%$$^&(*(*^%#@@$%&*()_(&*()_)(*&!!!!!!!!!

That’s pretty much how I feel about the latest episode of BoBF, lol. Whew, what an episode!

I really didn’t think we’d get to see Mando visit Grogu at all in this series; I thought we’d get back to Boba and maybe we’d see the little guy in The Mandalorian S3. It’s a strange decision, but I’m not complaining! Nevermind Cobb Vanth, Luke, Ahsoka Tano, and Cad Bane. Cameo riches!

Everything to Expect In 'The Book of Boba Fett' Season Finale - Inside the  Magic
OMG, these two…!

So backing up, Din makes good on his decision to go see Grogu (I’m not sure how he knows where they are or Luke’s name at all; Luke gave no information on that when he scooped up Grogu, but maybe they’ve been in contact? I don’t see why they would be, though. Any ideas?). He takes the Naboo Starfighter to a forested planet and runs into R2, who leads him to Luke’s new temple that’s in the process of being built. But no sign of Grogu or Luke. The ant-like droids that are building the temple make a bench for him to wait, so he waits.

Meanwhile, we see Luke training Grogu in another part of the forest. They’re meditating, and Grogu gets distracted by a frog (naturally) and nearly eats it. Luke notices, and uses the Force to lift a multitude of frogs from the pond, showing Grogu what he can possibly accomplish–if he focuses and commits himself. (CGI Luke looks great, by the way. I almost thought he was an actor who just looks remarkably like Mark Hamill, lol).

The Book of Boba Fett Episode 6: Star Wars Characters Cameos
ESB vibes, but cuter.

He talks about Yoda, and helps Grogu remember where he came from. We get a flashback of baby Grogu in the Jedi Temple during Order 66. Three Jedi are defending him against clone troopers who are attacking them. We don’t see how Grogu escapes, however. When he comes to, Luke tells him the galaxy can be a dangerous place, but he will teach him how to protect himself. He introduces Grogu to the training remote, and before long he’s hopping and flipping along, evading the thing. We even get a scene of Luke running through the forest with Grogu on his back, hearkening back to ESB with Yoda. Priceless!

THE BOOK OF BOBA FETT Episode 6 Review - The Last Movie Outpost
Friend of the family.

Din wakes up from a nap to see Ahsoka standing there. He’s surprised, and she says she’s a “friend of the family.” So obviously Luke and Ahsoka have met, and have talked about Anakin. I would have liked to see this meeting, but maybe we will in the Ahsoka show (please?). They walk to where they can see Luke and Grogu training. Ahsoka implies that Din is there for his own sake, rather than Grogu’s, and that if Grogu sees him it will make it harder. He gives her the gift the Armorer made, and with a heavy heart, he leaves.

Star Wars: The Book of Boba Fett Episode 6 Review
He looks a bit vulnerable without the armor, no?

Back on Tatooine, Din shows up at Boba’s palace, and we actually get to see Boba with his team. He has no speaking lines, however. Fennec says they need some ground forces or something, and Din says he might be able to help with that. So he goes to see Cobb Vanth and tries to convince him and the people of Freetown to help. I forgot to mention that the episode opened with a scene of Vanth running off some Pykes from his territory. So he knows that trouble is coming, but hates to get his people involved. He tells Din he’ll see what he can do, and once Din leaves, he notices someone walking into town from the desert (oh, he’s the guy from the title). And guess who it is?

Who Is Cad Bane? Explaining the Blue Meanie From 'The Book of Boba Fett'
Blue meanie.

Cad Bane, notorious bounty hunter from the Clone Wars (and recently The Bad Batch, facing off with Fennec over Omega). There’s a superb Western vibe as Bane faces off with Vanth, warning him not to get involved in the coming conflict. Vanth stands his ground, but unfortunately his gung-ho deputy gets involved and mouths off. Bane shoots the deputy down, and injures Vanth, then walks away. Pretty sure they’re gonna get involved now, lol.

The last scene is with Luke and Grogu. He shows Grogu the gift from Din, which turns out to be an adorable little chainmail shirt. But before he gives it to him, he also shows him Yoda’s old lightsaber, small enough for Grogu to wield eventually. Basically, he’s giving Grogu a choice: stay with him and train to be a Jedi, or go back to Din and be a Mandalorian. It ends there, with Grogu’s big sweet baby eyes unsure what to do.

I’m pretty sure Grogu will choose to go back to Din. Luke himself observed to Ahsoka that he wasn’t sure if Grogu’s heart was in the training. And of course there’s that Grogu-sized bubble just waiting for the little guy to fill it on the Naboo starfighter. And that’s why Grogu is not at the temple when Ben Solo destroys it. He’s not, dammit.

Oh, and Garsa Fwips’s cantina is blown up by the Pykes in a terrorist act. Luckily it looked like it was Max Rebo’s night off, so I’m guessing he survived–he’s a lucky little blue elephant guy. But Garsa’s character seems a little wasted here.

The Book of Boba Fett episode 6 recap: Mando diversion brings an epic  stranger to town - CNET
RIP. It was her prettiest gown, too.

Anyway, all the chess pieces are being placed on the board, and they’ll all come together next week in the finale. I think. I’m guessing The Book of Boba Fett is a one-shot deal and that there will not be a Season Two. I think, lol.

This show has definitely challenged our expectations of what it was ultimately going to be, and be about. Its structure is odd, to say the least, but it’s also given us some wonderful things, and that alone makes it worth watching. I can’t wait to see what happens next week! (Boba better charge out into the battlefield on that rancor, or I’ll be gravely disappointed, lol).

What did you think of Episode 6? Let me know in the comments and we’ll talk about it!

My Entertainment Weekend Update

Hello and happy weekend, my friends!

Honestly, I haven’t done much reading this past week. I finished The Fallen Star (you can check out my review here) and I’m just waiting for Midnight Horizon to come out Feb. 1st. I’ve read a few chapters of Race to Crashpoint Tower, but I can’t seem to get into right now. I’ll finish it eventually, lol.

The Book of Boba Fett episode 5 review: "Launches The Mandalorian season 3"  | GamesRadar+
Me watching Episode 5 of “Return of the Mandalorian.”

The Book of Boba Fett Episode 5, “Return of the Mandalorian” was fantastic, with Din Djarin returning and showing us what he’s been up to since he said goodbye to Grogu. You can check out my thoughts on the episode here.

I noticed on Disney+ there were a few new shorts from Marvel called “Marvel One Shots.” I think mostly they’re just little DVD extras from the movies over the years, but I hadn’t seen most of them. The Thor ones were the best, just hilarious, lol. Or the Daryl ones, I should say, because the one with the Grand Master was pretty funny, too. Jeff Goldblum is just weird and wonderful.

Jean Luc and his new crew (besides the hot Romulan).

Most of my interest this week has been taken up by watching season one of Star Trek Picard. I haven’t visited this franchise for a long while now, and I had an absolute blast catching up with Jean Luc Picard and his cohorts. It’s a wonderful show, completely unlike any Star Trek show I’ve ever watched (and I’ve watched them all, lol, except the new one, Discovery–that’s next, probably). Instead of a starship captain and his crew going on weekly adventures in space, this show focuses on a particular story, a mystery that Jean Luc feels compelled to unravel, propelling him out of retirement on his vineyard (retirement has never set well with Jean Luc anyway, lol). We meet interesting new characters, and get a few familiar faces, too, that warmed my heart. I just loved this show, and have so much to say about it, I’ll probably write its own post sometime soon.

That’s it this week. What’s been entertaining you? Let me know in the comments and we’ll talk about it!

The Book of Boba Fett Episode 5 Review

(Please be aware that there are spoilers for this episode in this post.)

Return of the Mandalorian

The Book Of Boba Fett' Episode 5 Review: The Mandalorian Makes This Show So  Much Better
He’s back!

So, yeah, we knew Mando was going to be making an appearance in the BoBF, but a whole darn episode?! I was both thrilled and a little puzzled about this, but let’s go on.

We finally get to see what Din Djarin has been up to since Grogu left with Luke Skywalker. Apparently he’s gone back to bounty hunting, but this particular bounty we see at the beginning of the episode is for information rather than money. He’s looking for his people, ie, the Armorer and anyone else left of his old crew. He’s given directions, and finds them on this cool-looking space station.

He and the Armorer talk about the Dark Saber, its history, The Night of a Thousand Tears, Bo-Katan Kryze; she makes a little something for Grogu from the beskar spear Din got from Ahsoka; and she trains him a bit in lightsaber battle. The blade becomes heavy for Din to wield, and the Armorer says that’s because he’s fighting the blade, not his opponent. Then the only other Mandalorian there challenges him for the Dark Saber (he’s an ancestor of Tar and Pre Viszla, and feels he should be the one wielding it). Din wins the battle–though not necessarily with the blade–but then the Armorer asks if he’s ever taken his helmet off in front of others, and he’s busted.

Easter Eggs You May Have Missed In The Book Of Boba Fett Episode 5
Maybe Luke can give him some lightsaber training when he visits Grogu.

The Armorer casts him out, and Din goes to Mos Eisley in search of Peli. She’s been apparently working on finding him another ship, and she’s got a Naboo starfighter. It’s from the time of the Republic and has definitely seen better days, but she convinces him to help her fix it up. And it turns out kind of great. (I can just see Grogu’s cute little head poking up in that astromech bubble, can’t you?) He takes it for a spin and he warms to the fast little ship. When he gets back, Fennec Shand shows up and asks him to help Boba, who’s in need of some muscle. Din agrees, and says he’ll do it for free. But first, he’s got someone he’s gotta check in with.

That’s basically the episode, and it was fantastic. I think we’re all just missing Mando big time, and it was wonderful to see him again. He’s clearly missing Grogu, and is directionless without him. Grogu was his moral compass, and now that the little guy’s gone, he went right back into bounty hunting. He doesn’t quite know what to do with the Dark Saber, and can barely wield it. It’s obvious he’s reluctant to take on the responsibility of the blade.

The Book of Boba Fett Episode 5 – What Did You Think?!
The Night of a Thousand Tears has a Terminator vibe.

He wants to go to Grogu and make sure he’s all right (in his conversation with the Armorer, she says that in the Jedi creed, they must let go of all attachments; Din points out that this is the opposite of the Mandalorian creed, which is one of loyalty. I’m curious to see how this will work out for Grogu, who is clearly attached to Mando).

I’m not holding my breath that we will actually see Grogu or Luke in any future episode of the BoBF, and we probably shouldn’t. We need to get back to Boba, especially with only two episodes left; the fact that Din got his own whole episode is another head-scratcher. Don’t get me wrong, I loved it. But this is Boba’s show, not The Mandalorian 2.5. Or maybe it is, I don’t know. But I can’t help but feel that The Book of Boba Fett suffers in comparison to anything Mando; it’s inevitable. It’s kind of not fair, lol. But it’s clear that these shows are linked, as I’m sure the Ahsoka show will further link in, so maybe it’s not a big deal.

Star Wars' Fans Blow Up the Internet, "1% Boba Fett...This Is the Way" -  Inside the Magic
Someone’s got a new ride.

It’s also interesting to note that these two very different men, who wear Mandalorian armor (but were not born on Mandalore in the way that Bo-Katan was) are trying to find their true identities. Boba is well on his way to redefining himself, but Din, now that he’s broken his creed for the sake of Grogu (who’s now gone) and has been cast out, is floundering and must find his way again. Maybe Boba can give him a few tips, lol.

At any rate, I’m eager to see the next two episodes of the BoBF and how Din will play a part in Boba’s quest to rule Tatooine.

What did you think of the episode? Do you think it hurt or enhanced The Book of Boba Fett? Let me know in the comments and we’ll talk about it!

My Entertainment Weekend Update

Happy weekend, my Star Wars friends!

So I’m still working on two books, Out of the Shadows and I Was Anastasia. It’s taking me a while because I’ve started another Loki book called Truth and Other Lies, by Lyra Wolf (what can I say, I’m obsessed, lol). It’s another mythical version of Loki, with all the usual players, just mixed up a little bit differently. It also borders on the paranormal romance with quite a few racy sex scenes. I don’t mind it, but it’s not exactly what I was expecting when I picked up the book, lol. The storyline is keeping me interested, though. It’s the first in a trilogy, and I have the first two on my Kindle, and pre-ordered the third, so I guess I have high hopes, lol. I may do a separate post on all the Loki books I’ve been reading, so stay tuned.

Speaking of Loki, I just finished watching the Loki series for the fourth time. I did say I was obsessed, lol. And so did I notice anything I missed during the first three viewings? Not really (although I’m sure there are plenty of easter eggs I don’t know about), except to realize that Loki is clearly more mischievous in this show than he was in the movies. In the films, he’s a trickster–which is similar but not quite the same–but mostly he’s a villain, an anguished family member, or a wise-ass. He’s angry a lot. But as the God of Mischief, you’d think there would be more tomfoolery. And in the show, we do get glimpses of this: when he plays around with the time device with Hunter B-15, clearly taking joy in tormenting her with it; when he and Mobius are in Pompei, and he just throws caution to the wind, exclaiming on top of the goat cart; and on the train on Lamentis, when he gets drunk and sings. These are just delightful moments, worthy of Loki’s elemental nature, which is just plain fun, and the show gave the creators time to explore that.

Come on, the end of the world is fun!

I also watched the latest What If? episode, which saw an assassin take out the Avengers one by one. At first I thought maybe it was Loki, but it didn’t quite make sense. It surprised me who it turned out to be; and Loki did make his appearance, at first to avenge Thor’s death, and then to help Nick Fury nab the killer. And then, of course, to take over Midgard, lol. It was a neat episode, as they all are. Fun little nuggets of Marvel.

In more Marvel news, I did catch the Spiderman: No Way Home trailer, after the whole leak debacle. I was more excited about seeing Dr. Strange in it than anything else, but he looked a bit…off, lol. Sweatpants? Snow in the Sanctum? And actually helping Peter with his request to change the fact that people knew who he was? It’s just all wrong. Is he an imposter? A variant? Possessed? What the hell’s going on? Very excited to see him, though, no matter how weird he is.

Finally, in the Star Wars universe, I watched the Mandalorian Gallery on Disney+ on the final episode of Season Two. You know, the one with Luke freaking Skywalker. Very cool, very fun to watch how they put it all together. I had no idea how they brought back a young Luke, except, you know, “technology.” The details are fascinating, and a bit bewildering. It’s so much work! And we are so glad and very lucky we have these dedicated people bringing our favorite characters to life, with so much care and respect. That’s why I love these behind-the-scenes specials, because it’s easy for us to take for granted the amazing shows we watch. But there’s literally an army’s worth of people, tons of talent, and painstaking work behind these shows and films, and I’m awed and thankful at all these souls who bring us such joy. So yeah, check it out if you can, lol.

That’s it for this week. What have you been up to? Let me know in the comments and we’ll talk about it!

Five of Luke Skywalker’s Best Moments

I had fun writing about Obi-Wan’s five best moments, so I thought I’d continue on that theme and do the same with Luke Skywalker. He’s got plenty of great moments too, but these stand out as THE best to me:

  • Trench run on Death Star 1.
Trust your feelings.

This is Luke’s shining moment in A New Hope. He’s young, idealistic, and ready to do his part to strike a blow against the Empire. His compatriots are shot down (and he loses his friend, Biggs Darklighter) and it’s up to him to drop the torpedo into the tiny little opening of the shaft that leads to the reactor (but that’s okay, he used to target womp rats back home and they’re not more than two meters). He’s supposed to use a targeting computer to make the shot, but then he hears Ben Kenobi’s voice: “Use the Force, Luke.” And so he turns the computer off, which is a HUGE leap of faith, because he basically just learned about the Force like, two days ago, and only got a glimmering of it against a remote on the Falcon. But Ben had faith in him, and so he has faith in Ben’s belief that he can do this. And he does. Han Solo gets the TIES off his back, Luke gets the torpedo into the shaft, the thing blows, and they have a big celebration. He’s not a Jedi yet, but he’s certainly now a hero of the Rebellion.

  • Battle of Hoth
“Get ready to launch that tow cable!”

Not only is Luke a good pilot, but he’s also quite clever. The looming AT-ATs seem indestructible, so Luke comes up with a plan only a farmboy rustling some animals ( can come up with: they use cables to trip up their long, ungainly legs. This is his best moment in The Empire Strikes Back; the rest of the movie, he makes a series of mistakes and bad decisions that almost get him killed. The Empire truly does strike back in this one–but they lose a few AT-ATs on the way!

  • Saving Han Solo on Tatooine.
“This is your last chance–free us or die.”

Black-clad Luke in Return of the Jedi is a thing to behold: after the debacles, revelations, and pain and loss in Empire, Luke has lost some of his naivete and innocence and has learned patience, planning, and determination. His rescue of Han at Jabba’s Palace on Tatooine (with a little help from his friends) is brilliant and thrilling. He’s calm, confident, and impressive. Even Han doesn’t believe Luke is capable of pulling off the rescue, but lucky for him he’s very wrong on this point. Leia strangles Jabba, Boba Fett is sent falling into the Sarlacc (but not, as we now know, killed), the barge is blown up, and they pick up the droids from the sand on the way out. Easy peasy. The hard stuff is yet to come.

  • Vader’s Redemption.
“I have to save you.” “You already have, Luke.”

This is obviously the zenith of Luke’s character arc, and his very best moment (apart from his role at Crait, in my opinion, see below). Yoda himself said before he died that Luke must face Vader. I’m pretty sure he meant that Luke had to defeat him in order to become a Jedi. Even Obi-Wan, in his ghostly visitation on Dagobah, expected Luke to kill Vader. Obi-Wan, one of the most compassionate Jedi ever! But Luke insisted he would not kill his own father. “Then the Emperor has already won,” Obi-Wan replies. So defeatist. And short-sighted, one of the very few things that is disappointing about Obi-Wan, at least in this trilogy. Both he and Yoda had given up on Anakin a long time ago, and I understand that, after what they went through. But Luke isn’t ready to give up on him. Like the mother he never knew, he believes there’s still good in him. I’m not sure where this belief comes from, whether it’s wishful thinking, or that he senses it in the Force, or maybe because Vader didn’t want to kill him in Empire but join with him (on the dark side, but even so).

Whatever the reason, Luke goes willingly to Vader and the Emperor on Endor with the intention of trying to turn him back to the light, as he explained to Leia. He keeps his poop together for a while, until the Emperor reveals the trap which endangers his friends; he gets scared and desperate for them. And then, when Vader threatens to turn Leia to the dark side, he loses said poop and gets really angry. He gets mighty close to falling to the dark as he nearly kills Vader, although he realizes it before it’s too late. That’s when his best moment in the trilogy comes: he throws his lightsaber away and declares he’ll never turn. He’s willing to lose his friends, his father and his life at this point; but he will not turn. We all know what happens next: the Emperor nearly kills Luke with his Force lightning, causing Vader to rethink his life choices. He decides to save his son and throws the Emperor down the shaft, sacrificing his own life. A great, possibly the greatest, Star Wars moment.

  • Battle of Crait.
“If you strike me down I’ll always be with you–like your father.”

So Luke Skywalker becomes a legend and a hero, and tries to live up to that over the decades that follow. Unfortunately, he’s a human being who makes mistakes. He loses Ben Solo to the dark side and blames himself (and probably deserves a little bit of blame, among a lot of blame that could be passed around). But instead of dealing with the mistake, he isolates himself. I do believe he thinks he’s helping his friends this way rather than hurting them–after all, look at the damage he did, is probably what he was thinking. He even cuts himself off from the Force, he’s so upset about it. He comes to believe that the Jedi must die, that their arrogance (his included) caused more problems than solved them. Rey doesn’t understand any of this when she comes to Ach-To; she’s still young and idealistic. She believes in the myth. Luke has become–let’s face it–cynical. It’s only after he opens up to the Force again to touch Leia’s consciousness that he decides to do something.

And what a something! He Force-projects himself to Crait to face Kylo and the First Order. Not to save Ben–he knows it’s too late for that, at least for him. But to distract the enemy long enough for the Resistance to get away. And he does it without harming a hair on anyone–except his own. It’s his atonement, as much as anything. And a very Jedi thing to do, in the truest sense. That wink to Threepio, the dusting off his shoulder after “surviving” the bombardment of the First Order, his “See ya around, kid,” to Kylo–I loved it all so much. It doesn’t quite reach the heroic and emotional heights of Anakin’s redemption, but it’s one of the best Luke Skywalker scenes, in my opinion.

Honorable Mention:

Coming to get Grogu.

“Talent is nothing without training.”

I can’t have a list of best Luke Skywalker moments without this scene from The Mandalorian (Season 2, Episode 8). It was so unexpected, but so welcome and exciting, most of us were laughing/crying on our couches. When Grogu reached out with the Force at the Jedi Temple, we had guesses and hopes about who might answer. The fact that it was Luke freaking Skywalker himself was just so satisfying and made our Star Wars hearts so happy. As soon as we saw that single X-Wing swing around and saw the other clues, our hearts skipped a beat. CGI Luke was a bit weird, as most CGI characters are, but who cares? He cut through those dark troopers like a hot knife through butter, and we cheered. But that Force crush he used for the last dark trooper is a bit…concerning. I do believe it’s considered, along with the Force choke, a darkside power. He could have just cut it down with his lightsaber, as he did the others, easily. But he chose to do the crush. Why? Hmmm….care to chime in with your ideas, dear readers?

So those are my (again, probably obvious) best Luke Skywalker moments. What are your favorites?

The Mandalorian: Fan Art

I’ve done several posts on Star Wars fan art, and it was great fun. I haven’t done one for The Mandalorian yet, and I’ve found some great artwork that I wanted to share. Enjoy!

This one is absolutely lovely, with Grogu touching Din’s face as in the final episode of Season Two. The blue butterflies are a nice touch.

Cecilia G.F., Artstation.com

I love how this one shows the two faces of Din Djarin.

carousel image 0
Isotoniclab, etsy.com

This one is a whimsical, colorful rendition of Din, Grogu, and Ahsoka. I love her staff (the one we see her with at the end of Rebels) leaning against the tree.

Marsxit, wattpad.com

This is a great one of Din and Grogu with Cara Dune. I love that shiny, iridescent armor!

Laurens Spruit, artstation.com

I’m guessing that’s one of Tatooine’s suns reflecting off Din’s helmet in this great piece.

Liam Brazier, reddit.com

And because my daughter constantly plays Fortnite, I just had to include this official screen art. Baby looks like he’s having a blast as Din shoots off laser bolts.

Official loading screen art for Fortnite.

Hope you enjoyed this fantastic fan art. There’s so much great talent out there, I’m sure I’ll be posting more now and then as I can’t help myself. Do you have some favorite Star Wars fan art, or make your own? Share in the comments below!

Image of Grogu with Ball courtesy of He-Be, redbubble.com.

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The Mandalorian: Chapter 16–The Rescue

Mandalorian Spoilers Ahead!!!

We finally made it to the Mandalorian finale, and it’s taken me a few days to recover and get my thoughts together, lol. This is a long one, sorry, but it can’t be helped!

I was so nervous going into this episode: would Grogu be rescued? How is Din’s team going to do it? Will he battle Moff Gideon? Will anyone die? Will we see the Jedi? And if so, who would it be? I was squirming with questions and anxiety, but I took a deep breath, sipped my tea, and just took it all in.

I was happy to see Din pick up Bo-Katan and her sidekick, Koska; now the team is complete. All the players are assembled, each with their own agenda and goals: Din, of course, just wants Grogu; Bo-Katan wants Moff Gideon dead and her Dark Saber back; Cara Dune wants to help Din get Grogu, and possibly capture Gideon so the New Republic can get some Imperial intel. Boba and Fennec are just there to fulfill their obligation to Din.

Everyone has their own motives, and there’s not a lot of love lost between Bo-Katan and Boba Fett. There’s some initial squabbling between the Mandalorians and Boba at first: Bo-Katan recognizes his voice as belonging to a clone (she’s met plenty of them during the Clone Wars) and says he disgraces his armor. Boba bites back, calling her “Princess” and again defending his right to the armor; he and Koska even wrangle a bit until Bo-Katan tells them to knock it off.

SPOILERS: 'The Mandalorian' Chapter 16 Recap – Where Does The Show Go Now?  – THE RONIN
The meeting of the Mandalorians.

All of this just reinforces the idea to Din that there are more ways than one to be a Mandalorian; in fact, it’s kind of up in the air as to what, exactly, makes one a Mandalorian. Is it the armor? The creed? Being born on Mandalore? It’s a big Mandalorian mess. And we’re still left wondering: IS Boba Fett a Mandalorian? His father was a foundling, like Din; so Boba has a right to the armor through lineage, but he didn’t grow up in the culture. Like everything else with Mandalorians, it’s confusing and contentious.

Anyway, off they go and capture Dr. Pershing, who is on an Imperial shuttle traveling–well, who knows where, maybe just being escorted back to Gideons’ ship. There’s an interesting exchange between one of the Imperials flying the shuttle, who is using Pershing as a human shield, and Cara Dune, who has her weapon trained on him, along with Din. He taunts Cara; he recognizes her as from Alderaan, and tells her he was on the Death Star when they blew up the planet. He states that millions of people were killed on those space stations when they were blown up by the Rebellion, and that Alderaan was worth it to stop terrorists. We’re not used to looking at the Rebels or the Resistance as terrorists (although the idea is explored more in the books) and it makes us a little uncomfortable. We know they’re the “good guys”, and of course they were right to blow them up. But again, “from a certain point of view,” they’re the bad guys. And in real life, it’s not always so crystal clear as in the movies or TV shows.

Anyway, Cara’s having none of it and she shoots him in the head, leaving poor Pershing nearly deaf. They get information from him about the layout of Gideons’s ship and make a plan: the team will create a distraction and head for the bridge while Din goes to find Grogu in the brig, taking into account the dreaded Dark Troopers, who need time to power up.

Boba pretends to be firing at the shuttle and Bo-Katan flies them into the TIE fighter launching bay; once that’s done, Boba jumps into hyperspace and we don’t see him until later (after the credits, as it turns out). The ladies plow through the ship, killing every stormtrooper in their path (I just love these 40ish women kicking ass), while Din heads for Grogu. He doesn’t quite get there before the Dark Troopers power up and start to come out. He manages to close the door, but one gets out, and he nearly gets killed fighting this thing. He manages to rip one apart with the beskar spear, and then flushes the rest of them out into space.

The Mandalorian Season Two Finale Review: “Chapter 16 – The Rescue” –  Mynock Manor
Don’t trust this guy.

Meanwhile, the team have made it to the bridge and kill everyone there, but Gideon is not there. Turns out, he’s anticipated their moves and is in the brig with Grogu, holding the Dark Saber over Baby (in his little baby manacles). He looks tired, because Gideon has taken a lot of his blood. Gideon tells Din about the Dark Saber, that it’s what Bo-Katan wants, and Din says, “Keep it. I just want the kid.” Gideon pretty much replies that he can take him and go, since he got what he wanted out of him; I can’t believe Din believed him and turned his back on him. The man’s a treacherous jerk. And of course, he attacks Din with the Dark Saber and we get the confrontation I knew was coming.

Gideon’s not bad with the Dark Saber, but Din is still better, even with just a beskar spear. He knocks the saber out of Gideon’s hand and bests him, but he doesn’t kill him. He cuffs him and brings him to the bridge, holding Grogu–and the Dark Saber. This is where things get interesting, as Bo-Katan looks with bewilderment as they enter. She made it perfectly clear that Gideon was HERS to defeat; and here was Din herding him onto the bridge as his prisoner.

THE MANDALORIAN Season 2 Finale Recap - The Beat
I foresee problems.

Gideon takes advantage of this, goading them both with the fact that Din can’t just hand over the saber to Bo-Katan. Din owns it now, since he won it in battle. And if Bo-Katan wants it, she must win it from Din in battle, as well. Din tries to simply give it to her–he doesn’t have any interest in fighting her for it–but Bo-Katan hesitates and says that Gideon is right.

So time out here–I think many of us who watched Rebels were wondering WHY she couldn’t just take it. Because Sabine had simply handed it over to her, and Bo-Katan accepted it. So why can’t she do that now? Are they suddenly changing the rules? Well, I don’t think so. Obviously Dave Filoni and John Favreau are aware of what happened in Rebels, so they wouldn’t have arbitrarily changed the rules. They know what they’re doing. And so, trusting in that, I think that Bo-Katan probably feels that, since she lost the Dark Saber and Mandalore along with it, she CAN’T simply take it yet again. She MUST fight for it, she MUST earn it back, or she may be considered a pretender to the throne of Mandalore. She must earn the Mandalorians’ respect and loyalty. That’s my take on it anyway. So even though Din tries to give it back to her, he’s stuck with the stupid thing.

But before she can do anything, the Dark Troopers return. They fly now, remember? And they march toward the bridge, and start pounding on the blast doors. And they can’t do anything except watch and wait for them to crash through that door. Gideon is again annoyingly arrogant, telling them only he and the Child will survive. He also shoots Bo-Katan with a blaster he’d hidden under his cloak on the floor, but I believe she survived. The others point their weapons at him, and he decides to kill himself, but Cara Dune knocks the blaster out of his hands and knocks him out.

The Mandalorian Resorts to a Deus Ex Machina to Stick the Landing in 'The  Rescue'
Luke Skywalker!!!!!!!

This is when the lone X-Wing appears, and my heart skipped a beat. One X-Wing. I can’t imagine it’s Trapper Wolf or that other guy, what’s his name. Can it be? Can it really be? They watch on the monitors as a Jedi floats down the hallways, his robes swishing, and engages the Dark Troopers. A green lightsaber flares. A GREEN lightsaber. A black-gloved right hand. OH MY GOD, it is! It’s Luke freaking Skywalker! My fingers dug into my poor husband’s arm.

He makes quick work of the troopers, and Din lets him in. The hood comes off, and there’s young Luke. It’s a CGI Luke, and as such there’s something a little off about him, but who cares? Din asks kind of a silly question: “Are you a Jedi?” Since he’s seen Ahsoka in action, can there be any doubt? But Luke simply says yes. He reaches out for Grogu. Din says he doesn’t want to go with him, but Luke corrects him: He wants Din’s permission to go.

So there’s the whole goodbye scene with Din and Grogu, and Din takes his helmet off in front of everyone so Grogu can see his face and even touch it. It’s painful for Din, for Grogu, for everyone watching. I love it when R2D2 rolls in and has a little conversation with Grogu, and Baby’s ears perk up a little bit. Then Luke leaves with Grogu, and that’s it. He’s gone.

The Mandalorian S2E8 “Chapter 16: The Rescue” | 25YL
Din shows his child his face.

Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful season-ender. And now everyone’s up in arms about what’s going to happen to little Grogu, is Kylo going to kill him at Luke’s Jedi Academy in 25 years? I don’t think so, and here’s why: at first I thought Din would give Grogu his little silver ball as a goodbye token. But he didn’t. Maybe he forgot in the heat of emotion. But that just proves to me that he WILL see Grogu again, and give him his little ball. I’m guessing Grogu will stay with Luke as long as he needs, to learn how to control his abilities, and then he will return to Din. How long will this take? Who knows. Five years? Ten? Twenty? But I think he’ll be gone by the time hell breaks loose with Kylo. At least, I have to believe this, or my heart will utterly break into a thousand pieces.

There’s also questions about Season Three. I’m assuming Grogu will be gone, so where do they go from here? Well, there’s the whole Mandalore question. Will Din help Bo-Katan take it back? Will Bo-Katan fight Din for the Dark Saber? I think those are the questions next season will address, and perhaps lead up to the big crossover between it and the new shows, Ahsoka and Rangers of the New Republic. Thrawn? Lots of possibilities here.

Of course, on my first watch, I missed the Boba Fett scene at the end of the credits. We usually watch the concept art during the credits, and then shut it off when they’re done. This one had no concept art, so it got shut off sooner than usual. I had to find out about the scene on social media, naturally, and I watched on my second viewing. It was intriguing. Not sure I’m too excited about it yet. If it also crosses over with The Mandalorian, I’m sure I’ll tune in.

So if you’re still with me at this point, I’m impressed! I don’t usually ramble on this long, but there was so much to unpack and comment on. It’s the finale, after all. Thanks for reading, and let me know what you thought of the show in the comments below!

Grogu and Luke || The Mandalorian || Chapter 16: The Rescue - The  Mandalorian Fan Art (43696143) - Fanpop
Bye-Bye, Baby

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The Mandalorian: Chapter 15-The Believer

Mandalorian Spoilers Ahead!!!

This was another great episode (is there any other kind?), with a lot going on in terms of action and characterization. And let me just say, I had no idea who Bill Burr was before The Mandalorian, but he’s great in my book.

The Mandalorian Chapter 15: The Believer Brings Bill Burr Back
“Heh heh, for a minute there I thought you were someone else.” Oh s**t.

Before the episode aired, the return of Migs Mayfeld was seen by some fans as unnecessary and underwhelming. Not a lot of people liked him, I guess, but I did. Even though he was part of the group that betrayed Din on that prison ship in Chapter Six, there was something about Mayfeld I liked. Maybe it was just his funny quips (I’m a sucker for humor). At any rate, I’ve always believed you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, and that there was probably more to him than met the eye.

And guess what? There WAS a lot more to Mayfeld, as we find out in this episode. In his conversation with Din in the juggernaut (well, it’s more like a Mayfeld monologue), we find out that he tends to look at the galaxy philosophically, stating that it doesn’t matter who rules the galaxy–Empire or New Republic–there will always be rulers and the ruled. He also challenges Din on his strict Mandalorian “rules,” asking him if he can’t take off the helmet, or he just can’t show his face? ‘Cause there’s a difference. And how we all get a bit lax on our principles when we get desperate.

The show further pushes Din when he has to take the helmet off in the mess hall to access the terminal they need for the codes. And he does what I knew he would do eventually–break his stubborn rules for Grogu. It’s what this show has been leading up to–challenging Din on what it means to be a Mandalorian. Challenging his very identity. And for Din, there was no question–he took the helmet off in a room full of people, even scanned his face so that it’s now permanently in the Imperial files. All for Grogu.

I loved that we got to see his face again finally. I like his face. It’s a nice face. I’d like to see more of his face in future episodes, which is what I think we’re working up to.

Din Djarin || The Mandalorian || Chapter 15: The Believer - The Mandalorian  Fan Art (43683303) - Fanpop
The “I don’t know how to function without my helmet” look.

Anyway, we get more insight into Mayfeld, as we find out he was a part of Operation Cinder, a battle that took place in the Aftermath books (which I shamefully have not read). We find out that this battle is the reason Mayfeld walked away from the Empire–the Imperials had incinerated an entire city, along with Mayfeld’s comrades, at least 10,000 of them. You can see Mayfeld getting worked up as he asks this commander, Valin Hess, if it was worth it. And of course this maniac replied it was, that they died for the glory of the Empire. And that was nothing compared to what they’re going to do with the rhydonium they’re mining. He says people think they want freedom, but they don’t: they want order. And when they’re done, the galaxy will be begging for the Imperials to come back and instill order.

During this whole conversation, you can just see Mayfeld’s ire rising until he looks as if he’s about to burst; while Din, as vulnerable as a child with his helmet off, is wishing Mayfeld will just shut up already. Finally, Mayfeld blasts Hess and they have to shoot their way out. But not before giving Din the stormtrooper helmet back and saying, “I never saw your face.”

The Kingsman connection you missed in The Mandalorian
Wanna get away?

I just love how this episode turns these two characters on their heads a little bit. Mayfeld rises in our esteem, while Din has to show vulnerability (even during the pirate action scenes, that stormtrooper armor is no match for his beskar armor–even though he’s still a bad ass warrior, he gets beat up. Those bruises are gonna hurt for awhile).

So who’s the Believer in the episode? It’s not as straightforward as we’d like. You have to think about it a little bit. Is it Din, who has to let go of some of his beliefs to find Grogu? Is it Mayfeld, who perhaps believes in himself again, and comes to believe in his own principles (“we have to sleep at night”)? I think it’s perhaps both, and that the title is deliberately ambiguous. It could mean many different things.

In addition to the great character development with Mayfeld and Din, here are a few other things I liked about this episode:

  • Cara Dune and Fennec Shand girl-power.
  • Walker cranes.
  • Boba’s new paint job.
  • That sigh of weariness from Din when he sees even more pirates coming.
  • “Brown Eyes.” That is all.
  • That Fett sonic boom!
  • And of course, Din’s message to Moff Gideon at the end of the episode, in which he throws Gideon’s own words back at him: “You have something that I want….He means more to me than you can ever know.” Not only is it a huge F**k You moment, we see that Din doesn’t just look at Grogu as his responsibility, a task, or a quest; he’s his child. And he will do anything to get him back. Which we already knew in our hearts.
The Mandalorian Chapter 15: The Believer Brings Bill Burr Back
Moff Gideon has no idea who he’s messing with: Mando Dad.

So even though Grogu wasn’t even in this episode (I missed his adorableness), it was okay, because we got a fantastic episode. I can’t believe the last episode of the season is next week, and I’m looking forward to how epic it’s inevitably going to be.

P.S.–I’ve never watched The Office, so I didn’t get the TPS reports joke. And I know, I should watch it.

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The Mandalorian: Chapter 14–The Tragedy

So we got to Tython a lot faster than I thought, and that’s just fine, because this was another great episode! When I saw the title, “The Tragedy,” however, I thought, uh-oh. Things are going to go very bad. And they did.

But not before we were wowed by Boba Fett, a character I was never particularly interested in; I just didn’t understand all the brouhaha over him. But this is The Mandalorian. If he was introduced into the show, I knew he’d do great things. And he did. The damage he did to those stormtroopers, both in and out of his armor, was colossal. Fennec was pretty cool, too, but clearly Boba was the star of the show. I was glad he got his old, beat up armor back, and also glad we got an answer to the question: is Boba Fett a Mandalorian? Turns out he is, as Jango had been a foundling and was in the Mandalorian Civil War. Cool to know. He wants the armor, and in return will help protect Din and the Child.

The Mandalorian' Chapter 14 Recap: "The Tragedy"
Boba returns.

Backing up, Din had put Grogu on the stone in the center of the Jedi Temple, and waited for him to do his thing. Baby just played with blue butterflies, which, of course brings to mind Ben Solo and the blue butterflies the fandom has associated with him, mainly in the guise of redemption, hope, transformation. What could this mean for Grogu?

Anyway, Grogu succeeds in linking up with the Force and sending out the vibes, and Din can’t get to him when he sees Slave 1 and decides it’s time to leave. So he tries to buy him time, and he, Boba and Fennec fend off an endless stream of stormtroopers. This is a very impressive fight sequence, and we see that Boba, though older and scarred, is an amazing warrior indeed. Unfortunately, Moff Gideon is high above in his ship and blasts the Razor Crest to bits.

Grogu in The Mandalorian || Chapter 14: The Tragedy - The Mandalorian Fan  Art (43670125) - Fanpop
Baby and Butterflies

Then Gideon sends down his Dark Troopers to retrieve the Child, who has collapsed out of his Force meditation and is drained from the experience. Din had taken off his jetpack in his initial confrontation with Boba, and either forgets about it or is too far away, and can’t reach Grogu in time before the nasty droids haul him away.

Tragedy indeed. No ship, and Grogu kidnapped. It’s what I expected (at least the abduction), but I’m still anxious for Baby. I enjoyed the scene of Grogu smashing the stormtroopers against the walls and each other on the ship, but he exhausted himself. Then Gideon showed up, taunted him, and cuffed him. I REALLY hated that guy just then. And off to Dr. Pershing they went.

The Mandalorian's new troopers reference a classic Star Wars game: Dark  Forces - Polygon
Gideon’s Dark Troopers

Meanwhile, Din retrieves the little silver ball Grogu loves from the wreckage of the ship, and the beskar spear. I see a battle between that spear and the dark saber in a future episode (and gleefully imagining the spear piercing Gideon’s gut, but we’ll see). Boba and Fennec reiterate that in return for the armor (which was Boba’s to begin with, but whatever), they will help him get the Child back.

They take Slave 1 back to Nevarro, where Din asks Cara Dune (now a New Republic Marshal–THAT’S what that medal was for) for help. He wants her help in springing Mayfeld from prison (from Chapter 6, the leader and the one with the cool over-the-shoulder gun). Din thinks he can help get the kid back, probably because of his Imperial past. I liked that guy, so it will be fun to have him back.

So Din is assembling his rescue team, but we’re left to wonder: who will answer Grogu’s call? Man, I really want it to be Luke, but I’d be surprised if was him. But this show has surprised us before. Again, we’ll see. And as much as I want Grogu to stay with Din, it’s clear the kid needs Jedi guidance. As much as I loved his stormtrooper-smashing, he was using the Force in fear, anger, and hatred–and we all know where that leads. I don’t want to see Baby go down that road. And yet, separating him and Din may lead to that as well. What’s the answer? Is he doomed?

Grogu in The Mandalorian || Chapter 14: The Tragedy - The Mandalorian Fan  Art (43671947) - Fanpop
Darth Grogu?

Comment below with your thoughts on this, on the episode, or what you think might happen next.

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